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Saturday, May 21, 2011

SURINAME - 137th Country Visitor..


A visitor from Suriname, the 137th country to visit my Blog, came online a few days ago.. Thanks for visiting my Blog...
Let's learn something about this country....

Suriname is the smallest independent country in South America. Situated on the Guiana Shield, it mostly lies between latitudes and 6°N, and longitudes 54° and 58°W. The country can be divided into two main geographic regions. The northern, lowland coastal area (roughly above the line Albina-Paranam-Wageningen) has been cultivated, and most of the population lives here. The southern part consists of tropical rainforest and sparsely inhabited savanna along the border with Brazil, covering about 80% of Suriname's land surface.
There are two main mountain ranges: the Bakhuys Mountains and the Van Asch Van Wijck Mountains. Julianatop is the highest mountain in the country at 1,286 metres (4,219 ft) above sea level. Other mountains include Tafelberg at 1,026 metres (3,366 ft), Mount Kasikasima at 718 metres (2,356 ft), Goliathberg at 358 metres (1,175 ft) and Voltzberg at 240 metres (790 ft).

At just under 165,000 km2 (64,000 sq mi) Suriname is the smallest sovereign state in South America. It has an estimated population of approximately 490,000, most of whom live on the country's north coast, where the capital Paramaribo is located.
The economy of Suriname is dominated by the bauxite industry, which accounts for more than 15% of GDP and 70% of export earnings. Other main export products include rice, bananas and shrimp. Suriname has recently started exploiting some of its sizeable oil and gold reserves. About a quarter of the people work in the agricultural sector. The Surinamese economy is very dependent on commerce, its main trade partners being the Netherlands, the United States, Canada and Caribbean countries.

Surinamese society is one of the most multilingual in the world. Dutch is the sole official language, and is the language of education, government, business and the media. Over 60 percent of the population speak it as a mother tongue, and most of the rest speak it as a second language. In 2004, Suriname became an associate member of the Dutch Language Union. It is the only Dutch, and one of the two non Romance-speaking countries in South America (the other is Guyana, formerly British Guiana).
In Paramaribo, Dutch is the main home language in two-thirds of households. The recognition of "Surinaams-Nederlands" ("Surinamese Dutch") as a natiolect equal to "Nederlands-Nederlands" ("Dutch Dutch") and "Vlaams-Nederlands" ("Flemish Dutch") was expressed in 2009 by the publication of the Woordenboek Surinaams Nederlands (Surinamese Dutch Dictionary). Only in the interior of Suriname is Dutch seldom used.
Sranan Tongo, a local creole language originally spoken by the creole population group, is the most widely used language in the streets and often interchangeably with Dutch depending on the formality of the setting.
Surinamese Hindi or Sarnami, a dialect of Bhojpuri, is the third-most used language, spoken by the descendants of South Asian contract workers from then British India. Javanese is used by the descendants of Javanese contract workers. The Maroon languages, somewhat intelligible with Sranan Tongo, include Saramaka, Paramakan, Ndyuka, Aukan, Kwinti and Matawai. Amerindian languages, spoken by Amerindians, include Carib and Arawak. Hakka and Cantonese are spoken by the descendants of the Chinese contract (koelie, coolie) workers. Mandarin is spoken by some few recent Chinese immigrants. English, Spanish and Portuguese are also used. Spanish and Portuguese are spoken by Latin American residents and their descendants and sometimes also taught in schools.
The public discourse about Suriname's languages is a part of an ongoing debate about the country's national identity. While Dutch is perceived as a remnant of colonialism by some, the use of the popular Sranan became associated with nationalist politics after its public use by former dictator Dési Bouterse in the 1980s, and groups descended from escaped slaves might resent it. Some propose to change the national language to English, so as to improve links to the Caribbean and North America, or to Spanish, as a nod to Suriname's location in South America, although it has no Spanish-speaking neighbours.


Photos about Suriname:

Special attention to Aizat Ahmad, Abdul Haanan and Suhail Qamil....
Have a nice day....

1 comment:

Aizat 'BIG' Ahmad said...

fuuuhhhh... model mna la iklan bju neh..

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